How to Navigate Arousal
in Agility & at the Startline
for Optimal Results

What you’ll learn:

Examples of how "hyping up" your dog can backfire

Why arousal in dog sports is overrated

How arousal levels impact each and every one of our dogs

What you can start applying today to achieve optimal arousal levels

THIS VIDEO IS A PART OF OUR

Solid Startlines Stay

Our Students Love Fundamentals Courses

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Christine
Christine
1 month ago

Looking forward to the course opening up.

Anja Troha
Anja Troha
1 month ago
Reply to  Christine

We are sure you’re going to love it!! 🙂

Denise
Denise
1 month ago

I need this course –

Anja Troha
Anja Troha
1 month ago
Reply to  Denise

Coming soon!!

Jo Gauthier
Jo Gauthier
1 month ago

hello, I’m looking forward to learning more. I have a dog that is over the top and very intense in everything we do. I can’t even go anywhere in the house; she thinks we are going somewhere or playing agility. I’ve tried self control exercise without luck. also she’s toy obsessed. I avoid toys for jumping exercise. She plows into the jumps and wings.

admin
Admin
1 month ago
Reply to  Jo Gauthier

Hi, 
It sounds like your dog is having some arousal issues for sure. We will address this lightly in our Solid Startline Stay course – however, it would be ideal to work on this problem holistically through remote consultations. Arousal and over-excitement are strong emotions that oftentimes require work outside of the agility field. You can start by asking yourself where your dog participates in routines that spike their arousal levels and where you can nurture a calm mindset instead. If you are looking for guidance, we are always available to help you through this with private online consultations.

Susan
Susan
1 month ago

I’m looking forward to implementing your suggestions to manage my very intense border collie. I do believe there is light as she has become more settled at home. I’m unable to have her calm when we run agility…..on the side of the ring or when she runs. She will keep running back at me instead of driving forward so it’s really frustrating.

admin
Admin
1 month ago
Reply to  Susan

Hi, we are sure you’ll love our exercises and tips within our Solid Startline Stay course. In regards to running back to you instead of focusing on obstacles and committing to them, we recommend our friend’s Essential Agility Training Skills course to polish the foundations and understanding of what you’re asking your dog to do – the confidence in the skill will already reduce arousal levels and frustration.

Merry
Merry
1 month ago

She’ll stay at home and when I’m out walking but not when she is doing agility. Did at the beginning but not now. Looking forward to see if this will help

admin
Admin
1 month ago
Reply to  Merry

Hi, thank you for commenting. Agility training introduces higher arousal, which could be the reason why your dog becomes so filled with anticipation that their perfect stay breaks down. Maintaining their position at home or during a walk might be easier because there’s no exciting activity following their stay. We will be addressing this in our class. 🙂

Last edited 1 month ago by admin
Anne
Anne
1 month ago

I actually don’t have a problem in start line,. The problem I have is keeping my dogs attention while doing a longer course. She gets distracted so easily. Often she start sniffing around and forgets everything around her…

admin
Admin
1 month ago
Reply to  Anne

Hi,
Thank you for your comment.
Does your dog have this problem only during competitions or does it also occur during training sessions?

Sniffing and getting distracted could be a result of feeling overwhelmed and stressed. It’s possible that your dog might not be ready for longer sequences yet.

In my approach to training, I aim to only do as much as my dog is comfortable with. This means ensuring they stay happily engaged and attentive during the training process.
To address this issue, my plan of action would involve increasing the value of the activity. This can be achieved by using higher motivation rewards, building confidence and understanding on individual obstacles, and refraining from running a complete course if your dog is unable to do so without getting distracted.

By establishing strong foundations, structuring sessions effectively, and setting your dog up for success, you can help them gain confidence. Confidence leads to joy, and with joy, there comes staying in the game and not wandering off the course.

Your goal is to build a love for the game. When your dog loves the process, adding higher expectations will be a piece of cake, but they have to want to be a part of the process first and you get that by setting very simple challenges and making your dog feel like they are on top of the world.

That might mean it will take a bit longer before your dog can run a full course while keeping the focus, but whenever things go wrong along the process, it is important to take a few steps back and build stronger foundations. 🙂

Hope this helps a little!

Anne
Anne
1 month ago
Reply to  admin

Thank you so much for answering.
We’re not doing competition, it’s during training sessions.
I started agility only 4 months ago…
It looks like I have to work harder on creating a stronger bound between the two of us.
We’re working on doing small sequences still, and it could be that she’s a little bit overwhelmed about it.
About to increase the reward, how do I do that?
I bring her favorite toy, specific for our training sessions, and I try to encourage her.

Martina
Martina
1 month ago

Thats what we Need – my Border Collie Girl and me very exited to learn more
Martina and Malu

admin
Admin
1 month ago
Reply to  Martina

Hey, excited to welcome you into our course!! 🙂

Kirsti Cockburn
Kirsti Cockburn
1 month ago

Hi, looking forward to understanding arousal more🙂

admin
Admin
1 month ago

Hi,

Excited to have you on board!

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